Utah Ketamine Authority

Ketamine and Crisis Therapy

Ketamine and Treatment of Crisis Therapy

A crisis is an overwhelming event such as the discovery of a serious illness, thoughts of suicide, the loss of a loved one, a divorce, or exposure to violence. A crisis can be a traumatic event or experience, but can also be how an individual reacts to a situation. Crisis therapy is a short term intervention to help reduce the impact and damage of the event as well as stabilize the individual in crisis.


Crisis Therapy is complex and requires treatment tailored to the specific needs and symptoms of the client. Crisis Therapy is usually brief and focuses on assessment of the situation, making a plan to stabilize the client, treatment, and maintenance. Therapy may not be limited to the individual, but may also include family members. Loved ones can be both a source of support and conflict, however, including them in treatment can help them understand, gain coping skills, and improve communication. Our counselors are skilled crisis therapists and are trained in Positive Psychology, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).


Resources and Relevant Studies

Effects of ketamine on explicit and implicit suicidal cognition: a randomized controlled trial in treatment-resistant depression

Background: Preliminary evidence suggests intravenous ketamine has rapid effects on suicidal cognition, making it an attractive candidate for depressed patients at imminent risk of suicide. In the first randomized controlled trial of ketamine using an anesthetic control condition, we tested ketamine’s acute effects on explicit suicidal cognition and a performance-based index of implicit suicidal cognition (Implicit Association Test; IAT) previously linked to suicidal behavior.

Conclusions: Intravenous ketamine produces rapid reductions in suicidal cognition over and above active placebo. Further study is warranted to test ketamine’s antisuicidal effects in higher-risk samples.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24668760/



A possible role for ketamine in suicide prevention in emergency and mainstream psychiatry

Background: Preliminary evidence suggests intravenous ketamine has rapid effects on suicidal cognition, making it an attractive candidate for depressed patients at imminent risk of suicide. In the first randomized controlled trial of ketamine using an anesthetic control condition, we tested ketamine’s acute effects on explicit suicidal cognition and a performance-based index of implicit suicidal cognition (Implicit Association Test; IAT) previously linked to suicidal behavior.


https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24668760/